Tokyo Ghoul

Shy Ken Kaneki is thrilled to go on a date with the beautiful Rize. But it turns out that she’s only interested in his body—eating it, that is. When a morally questionable rescue transforms him into the first half-human half-Ghoul hybrid, Ken is drawn into the dark and violent world of Ghouls, which exists alongside our own.

(Publisher Description)


Tokyo Ghoul
By Sui Ishida
ISBN: 9781421580364
VIZ, 2015
NFNT Age Recommendation: Adult (18+)
Volumes available: 14 (Series complete)


Our Review

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 1

Related Reviews

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 2

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 3

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 4

Tokyo Ghoul: re, vols. 1-3

Tokyo Ghoul: re, vols. 1-3

Tokyo Ghoul: re is the sequel to Sui Ishida’s hit horror manga, Tokyo Ghoul. The setting is a Tokyo not unlike ours, with the exception that monstrous ghouls walk among us, disguised as humans, while preying on them for food. The ghouls are gruesome killers and operate similarly to street gangs or the mafia. They organize as clans and get up to all kinds of nefarious stuff, mostly eating humans and sometimes other ghouls. To combat the ghouls, there is a Commission of Counter Ghouls. This group works as a supernatural police force investigating murders and crimes related to ghoul activity. The book centers around one group of new recruits, the Quinx Squad, led by Haise Sasaki. Readers familiar with Tokyo Ghoul will quickly realize Sasaki is actually Ken Kaneki who is suffering from amnesia.

Kaneki was the central character in Tokyo Ghoul. In it, he survived an attack by a ghoul, but surgeons unknowingly transplanted a ghoul organ into his body. This organ, called a kagune, turns Kaneki into a ghoul/human hybrid. The kagune acts like a flexible, bony, deadly tentacle and is a ghoul’s predatory organ, emerging when the ghoul is stressed, in danger, or hungry. Kagunes are nearly indestructible with conventional weapons, so the CCG harvests the kagune from deceased ghouls to create weapons called quinques for their investigators.

Following the events of Tokyo Ghoul, the CCG creates the Quinx Squad. This squad is special as recruits signed up to have quinques surgically implanted in their bodies, making them ghoul hybrids like Kaneki/Sasaki. (I will refer to him as Sasaki from here on.)

Volume one centers around introducing the Quinx Squad and how the CCG operates. The Quinx Squad’s goal is that its members will surpass the CCG’s star ghoul investigator, Kisho Arima. Of course, the Squad bumbles along, in spite of their powers. Sasaki struggles to control his subordinates and often flounders as the mentor he’s supposed to be. Toru Mutsuki is unable to get his kagune to manifest and wears an eye patch to cover up the ghoul eye he can’t make go away. Ghouls’ eyes glow red when fighting or eating but otherwise remain normal as part of their human disguise. Matsuki’s inability to hide his ghoul eye is a serious problem. Mutsuki also identifies as trans and the Squad is unaware. Kuki Urie is the new recruit with a chip on his shoulder. Urie thinks he’s better than everyone else and often makes foolish decisions. His arrogance leads him into things like not waiting for backup or chasing down ghoul suspects on his own. Ambitious and manipulative, Urie hates Sasaki and wants to be in charge. Ginshi Shirazu is the affable screw up. He joined the squad because he’s always behind on his bills and needed the money. The last Quinx Squad member is absent from the first volume. Saiko Yonebayashi spends her days locked in her room at the Quinx apartment. She spends most of her time playing video games and watching anime. She did really well on the Quinx aptitude test in school, so her mother signed her up for the financial compensation. Saiko doesn’t want to work but she really doesn’t want to go back to her abusive mother. Sasaki is empathetic to this situation.

Volume one of Tokyo Ghoul: re does a great job weaving the character introductions within the context of the storyline. There is a ghoul called “the Torso” that is killing women and taking their torsos, leaving behind the head and appendages. Quinx Squad isn’t supposed to investigate the case as they are still too green. Egotistical Urie decides he can solve this case, despite not being fulling trained. Through a series of events that leads to angering the more experienced squad handling the Torso case, Quinx Squad ends up collaborating with them at the request of a senior investigator. It’s a race to who can get a physical description of the Torso first. They figure out, based on the murder victims and locations, that the ghoul must be a taxi driver who picks up people around hospitals. All the victims have surgery scars on their torsos. The squad splits up to cover more ground, investigating  different hospitals. Mutsuki jumps into a cab following a hunch. The driver is the Torso. He attacks Mutsuki, ripping open his shirt, revealing his trans identity. There is an immediate backstory flashback. This reveal is an example of trans body horror and is incredibly disrespectful to trans individuals. It is degradingly played out for shock value. Mutsuki is able to get away from the ghoul and the rest of the team attacks. The Torso turns out to be part of the Aogori Tree Clan and a ghoul named Orochi shows up to save him. Sasaki goes head to head with Orochi and that’s when we find out Sasaki is part ghoul.

As in the original series, Sasaki continues an internal struggle with his internal ghoul personality. Sasaki, fighting in full ghoul mode, has a hard time regaining his control. The CCG, aware of this problem, is ready to eliminate him if he cannot control the monster within, but Sasaki comes back to himself. Volume one concludes with the squad finding out they will investigate the Aogori Tree Clan. Quinx Squad goes to the coffee house Sasaki used to hang out at when he was Ken Keneki. The ghouls running the place recognize him but he doesn’t remember them.

Volume two finally introduces Saiko Yonebayashi. Sasaki promoted Shirazu to leader and demoted Urie from leadership position to teach him humility. Now Shirazu is tasked with getting Saiko up and working which lends the story some comic relief.

The Quinx Squad is assigned the Nutcracker case. The Nutcracker is a ghoul who consumes men’s testicles. She also works for ghoul madams and there is an upcoming ghoul auction in which human victims will be auctioned off. A sting operation is put into place to get close to the Nutcracker and get into the auction. Since the ghoul is looking for women, the squad dresses as women, hoping to get an introduction to the Nutcracker at a nightclub.

This creates an awkward situation with Mutsuki’s trans identity and he is obviously uncomfortable. However, Mutsuki makes a connection with the Nutcracker, and they get the information regarding the location and time of the auction. Suzuya decides to use Mutsuki as bait, which leads to Mutsuki in another dress, getting kidnapped and sold on the auction floor along with CCG investigator, Juzo Suzuya. All hell opens up when it’s Suzuya’s turn to be auctioned off. He has a prosthetic leg filled with knives that he unleashes into the audience. Volume two ends in chaos.

Volume three has multiple events taking place at the ghoul auction. This series is really good at threading subplots throughout the main story line and you really see that here. This is a high level CCG operation mobilizing all their squads. It can be a little chaotic keeping up with everything going on as there are a lot of quick cuts to the next subplot/main plot element. The reader is introduced to more ghouls like the Clowns, more members of Aogori Tree (who are providing security for the auction), Big Madam, and Kanae. Mutsuki keeps trying to get away, but is chased by the Torso and then by Kanae. Kanae works for Master Shu, the ghoul that was obsessed with trying to eat Ken Kaneki in the original series. He is sure that his master will enjoy eating Matuski and wants to bring him back with him. Urie ends up rescuing Matuski. Instead of regrouping with other squads, they strike out for Big Madam because Urie is only thinking about glory gained. It does not go well for him, but Suzuya steps in and deals with the Madame. His story is in Tokyo Ghoul and this wraps up some unfinished business from his past. Shirazu and Saiko go toe-to-toe with the Nutcracker and win by using the ghoul’s own traps against her. Meanwhile, Sasaki is in a fight with a ghoul who calls him Ken Kanaki, causing another internal struggle between him and his inner ghoul. Sasaki comes to terms with the fact that he is also Ken Kaneki. Another ghoul defends Sasaki because she was friends with Ken Kaneki while Sasaki is wrestling with his identity. Volume three wraps with the CCG debriefing the case. There were a lot of casualties on both sides, ghoul threats eradicated, and important intel gained.

Toyko Ghoul: re is a gory horror manga suited more for older teens and adults. The art is really well done and the fight scenes are so frenetic readers can feel the energy jumping off the page. There is so much happening in big action sequences that it can be a little confusing. Each character has a well thought-out design and all are easy to visually tell apart. Readers should read the first series for a better understanding of plot lines and character motivations. I did not read Tokyo Ghoul, but was able to follow the story well enough. I did look things up if I felt I was reading something about a character that I should know from the original series. Each volume has extra content at the end of the book: small character vignettes or even short stories which add some more depth. I really enjoyed Sasaki’s conflict over his identity. It is a great metaphor for mental illness or accepting one’s flaws and vulnerabilities.

Where this series fell apart for me was Mutsuki’s trans identity. His trans reveal is done in a very disrespectful way and he’s never given real agency over his plot line. Using him as bait and having him dress as a woman is a transphobic creative choice and is not the only one in this series. I can’t in good conscience recommend adding it to a library collection. An LGBT character needs to have agency over their own storyline and also have acceptance of that identity. That is not present in this manga.

Tokyo Ghoul: re, vols. 1-3
By Sui Ishida
Vol. 1 ISBN: 9781421594965
Vol. 2 ISBN: 9781421594972
Vol. 3 ISBN: 9781421594989
Viz Media. 2017-2018
Publisher Age Range: Older Teen

Tokyo Ghoul Illustrations: zakki

The Tokyo Ghoul franchise, which has steadily raised its own media empire over the past three years, from manga and anime to light novels and film, has amassed a trove of character designs and production art. Tokyo Ghoul Illustrations: zakki, while relatively slim, is a beautiful collection of creator Sui Ishida’s art from across the franchise’s existence. Fans of Tokyo Ghoul and colorful, painterly character art in general will have much to enjoy within this jacketed hardcover’s smooth pages.

The book reads right to left, as per Japanese books, and the cover type for Tokyo Ghoul is broken and dripping (is that a drop of blood in the O?) over a couple of the protagonists’ smiling faces. A paper clip to the side completes the message: this book is a friendly visit to some beloved characters who went through some disturbing events in their series, with documents and messages from Ishida. The ‘zakki’ in the title is Japanese for “miscellaneous notes.”

Artwork is collected according to three categories: color art from each manga volume, illustrations for Young Jump magazine and elsewhere, and additional artwork. Throughout, Ishida provides commentary on the production, reception, or personal reaction to each piece. “Even if I’m engrossed in what I’m drawing, once it’s done, I lose interest. So I don’t usually look back on my art.” While this closing comment from Ishida (there’s no introduction or foreword) may be true, his commentary on all of the preceding pieces of art tell a story of an artist and storyteller who has weathered failure and success on the way to building his series.

The artwork of Tokyo Ghoul in this collection suggests a story full of charismatic, well-dressed, somewhat monstrous young adults whose lives blur horror and affection. The commentary tells a separate story of an overworked artist maneuvering Comic Studio, SAI, Painter, and Flash software in pursuit of deadlines and praise from his editor and his sister. Readers will enjoy learning more about the man behind the stylus. Some pieces he ‘self-rejected’ before developing too far while others went through multiple drafts before completion. Digital carelessness ate more than one illustration—as Ishida puts it, “Digital tools are useful, but sudden crashes are scary.” Save early, save often!

The full-color cover art and chapter pages are gorgeous, reproduced here with clarity and vibrant colors. Smaller pieces whipped up for bookstore promotions and character birthdays carry Ishida’s unmistakable penchant for blurred, painter-like digital brushwork. The only exceptions are a handful of black and white line pieces, including some sketches and a breakdown of a character’s tattoos. The only black and white manga pages are thumbnail samples of a side story he drew without assistants and a couple of four-panel gag comics. Ishida credits inspiration for a couple of pieces from Nakayama Atsushi’s Nejimaki Kagyu and Kazue Kato’s Blue Exorcist.

While none of the 112 pages in this art book contain explicit material or language, there is one spread involving a nude woman drawn in profile inside a glass container. The Tokyo Ghoul manga series is rated T+, so keep that demographic in mind when shelving this title with other art books.

Tokyo Ghoul Illustrations: zakki
by Sui Ishida
ISBN: 9781421596921
Viz, 2017
Publisher Age Rating: N/A

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 4

Tokyo Ghoul, Vol. 4

With the death of a First-Class Ghoul Investigator and attacks on Doves, both ghouls and humans are on high alert and everyone’s a suspect. Even worse, ghouls don’t just need to be more cautious of humans, but around their own kind as well. Enter Shu Tsukiyama, a ghoul known to all as The Gourmet, due to his eccentric tastes, who remains a mystery to Ken Kaneki. Soon enough, Kaneki’s newfound friendship with this suspicious character will unearth new information behind Rize’s death and turn our world upside down.

Just when you thought you had Kaneki and his world figured out, creator Sui Ishida flips everything on its head in Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 4. It’s no secret that Ishida is a great writer, but his skill as a storyteller reaches a whole new level in this volume. As readers are introduced to emerging players like The Gourmet and ghoul ally Itori, we find out who they are and the role they’ll play in Kaneki’s life. But it’s our job to determine if we can trust what they’re saying and, unfortunately for Kaneki, his continued naiveté makes him easy prey. The Gourmet also introduces readers to a dangerous new world that leaves a lasting yet violent first impression, as well as a plethora of unanswered questions regarding his true intentions.

Ishida also gives Touka more character development, allowing us to see her interactions and friendships with humans, as well as her playful personality in her relationship with Kaneki. As we see how she fits in among her peers, we gain a better understanding of who she is beneath the tough ghoul exterior to which we’ve grown accustomed. Sadly, she’s only in the first few chapters of volume four; her story comes to a screeching halt with a missed opportunity to properly explore her character, which makes this small glimpse seem out of place in the overall storyline.

Ishida distinguishes text-based speech with font changes when more than two characters are present, which helps to guide the reader through conversation without interruption. On occasion, the text was difficult to read, hindering the story’s flow during particularly detailed scenes. Luckily, these instances were few and far between.

Tokyo Ghoul is visually striking, with detailed imagery, especially during numerous character close-ups in moments of high emotion. As always, Ishida’s illustrations are reflective of what’s happening and can easily carry the storyline without the use of text. For example, the fine detail put into The Gourmet’s character design deliberately gives readers an uneasy feeling. There’s a creepiness we haven’t seen in other characters, and readers will have an immediate reaction to him.

The artwork has gotten more graphic due to the gruesome turn this volume has taken and it gives us an idea of the direction in which we can expect future volumes to continue. Ishida’s artwork truly shines in the very graphic final chapters of the book, as limbs are ripped apart and bodies smashed to a bloody pulp. Ishida does not miss a beat, putting the reader right there in the action and showing the urgency with which Kaneki tries to escape the trap he’s falling into—the emotions felt by him and those around him are palpable.

As Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 4 is grislier than previous installments, it’s best suited for older teens and adults. Despite the violence, it is well-written and impactful. This volume’s brutal, emotionally charged final chapters end on one heck of a cliffhanger that’ll make you rush to get the next installment. Tokyo Ghoul keeps getting better and better, and it’ll be exciting to see where the story will take us.

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 4
by Sui Ishida
ISBN: 9781421580395
VIZ, 2015
Publisher Age Rating: OT (16+)

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 1

120 Campus DriveKen Kaneki is a shy college freshman who loves to read horror novels and likes to hang out with his best friend, Hideyoshi “Hide” Nagachika, at a coffee shop called Anteiku. The two often discuss ghouls, creatures who appear in human form but eat human flesh, and their increasing attacks in the area.

It is at Anteiku that Kaneki first spots the beautiful Rize. Hide thinks she’s out of Kaneki’s league and teases him relentlessly about asking her out. One day, Rize accidentally drops her book and Kaneki notices they are reading the same title. When the two make plans to go on a date at a bookstore, the night seems to be something from Kaneki’s dreams. But on the walk home, things take a turn for the worse when Rize takes a bite out of Kaneki’s shoulder and he discovers she is a ghoul. Kaneki fights for his life, but he is no match for the supernatural Rize. When it seems that all hope is lost, a beam falls from a nearby construction site, appearing to kill Rize. Barely alive, Kaneki is taken to the hospital where his life is changed forever.

Kaneki wakes up to find that he was severely injured and received life-saving organs from a girl who was found crushed nearby. From that moment on, Kaneki no longer feels like himself. He begins to notice a change: food he used to love tastes absolutely disgusting and his left eye has turned a different color, which he tries to hide with an eye patch. Suddenly he doesn’t see other people as fellow humans, but as his next meal. Horrified by these developments, Kaneki isn’t sure what is going on at first; but after watching a show on ghouls, he believes he is transforming into one.

Kaneki attempts to return to his normal routine and goes back to school, but Hide notices something isn’t quite right. When Hide and Kaneki go on an errand to retrieve a DVD from a classmate, Nishiki Nishio, Kaneki recognizes Nishio as a ghoul. Nishio says they’ll need to go elsewhere to pick up the disc and Kaneki decides to tag along to make sure Hide is ok, but Nishio leads them to a back alley where he attacks Hide and leaves him seriously hurt. Kaneki is terribly injured in his attempt to defend his friend, only to be saved by the intervention of Toka, a waitress at Anteiku and a ghoul. Kaneki then awakens at Anteiku where he is given the chance to learn more about ghouls and acclimate himself to his new life.

The first installment of Tokyo Ghoul serves as an introduction to the dark world inhabited by Ken Kaneki: much of this initial volume centers on building Kaneki’s character and explaining the existence of ghouls and their world. Kaneki is a rather naïve and sheltered young man who is mostly ignorant of ghouls and doesn’t realize how close he has been to them all this time; this costs him greatly when he is easily targeted by the ghoul Rize. Throughout his transformation into a ghoul, he refuses to eat because he still sees himself as a human and not a “monster.” Eventually, he comes to the realization that he is different, and he must make sacrifices to protect his loved ones.

Tokyo Ghoul drew me in from the start, mostly due to the story of the ghouls. Characters who seem to be standard at first are then revealed to have secrets and alternate identities, and it becomes interesting to try to figure out who may be a ghoul. During the world-building, there are bouts of intense action, and it can sometimes be difficult to understand what’s going on since the artwork is blurry. This is a dark story with elements of gore, so those with weak stomachs may want to pass. I, however, am definitely intrigued by the characters and ghouls and can’t wait to learn more in the next volumes.

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 1
by Sui Ishida
ISBN: 9781421580364
Viz Media, 2015
Publisher Age Rating: T+/Older Teens

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 3

Tokyo Ghoul, Vol.3Investigator Ippei Kusaba and Hiname Fueguchi’s mother have both been violently murdered for crimes they did not commit. Ghouls and humans alike must now cope with their losses while continuing their neverending fight for survival. Already nearing the point of no return, ghoul Touka Kirishima and Senior Investigator Kureo Mado are driven further down the path of destruction while seeking retaliation for the loss of their comrades. Ken Kaneki, meanwhile, is no longer an innocent bystander in the battle, but a key player as he dives deeper and deeper into their world.

While many manga series tend to lose steam within a few volumes, Tokyo Ghoul only continues to rise. Kaneki is finally beginning to find purpose and balance in his new life as his connection to the ghoul world strengthens. He continues to fight for his humanity and resists becoming a murderer, but his new ghoul instincts make it difficult. His willpower is especially tested when he goes into battle with Inspector Amon: Kaneki wants to hurt Amon enough to surrender and prevent him from helping Mado, who is battling Touka, but not enough to cause irreparable damage. Initially, Kaneki holds back, but he soon realizes he can only get what he wants if he momentarily surrenders his humanity and unleashes his ghoul side, which proves much easier than he’d anticipated. Author/illustrator Sui Ishida sends readers on the same rollercoaster of emotions Kaneki experiences while facing Amon, placing us right beside him in battle.

Similarly, we are taken further into the world Ishida has created as we get to know other characters better. Even though Inspector Amon has lost a colleague and hunts ghouls for a living, he does not view things in simple black and white. Unlike Mado, he is not blinded by hate, and he tries to understand the significance of Kaneki’s hesitation during their confrontation and vocalize the messed up realities of the world; he is Kaneki’s best hope at ending all the senseless killings. Characters like Kaneki and Amon are great contrasts to Mado and Touka, who show a complete lack of empathy to one another and only seek vengeance. These characters add depth to the story and mirror what readers may be feeling as the plot progresses. The line between right and wrong continues to blur, and it grows more difficult to decide which side you’re on.

Once again, Ishida’s artwork clearly represents emotions felt by the characters, which in turn affects our connection to them and the events in the book. Severe facial close-ups capture the gravity of the situation and the emotions of the moment, especially during fight scenes; this is most powerful in the scene where Kaneki is fighting Amon, pleading with him to walk away to prevent Kaneki from becoming a murderer. The book’s black and white illustrations begin with lighter tones in the first few pages, but quickly evolve into darker gray and black tones that capture the anguish, hate, and fear felt by the characters. Certain panels are drawn entirely in black, representative of the dark nature the book has developed and will continue going forward.

Unfortunately, some of the same issues that plagued the previous installment have bled into this volume. Fight scenes are still indistinguishable and difficult to follow. Many times one has to reread certain scenes to figure out what is going on, especially when Touka and Mado are fighting. Line work and hues need more clarity; characters tend to blend together, in turn affecting the effectiveness of the scene.

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 3 is best suited for older teens and adults due to the graphic content of its fight scenes. It is a great topical read that deals with the timeless issue of right and wrong, illustrating how we need to understand one another before we consider harming each other.

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 3
by Sui Ishida
ISBN: 9781421580388
VIZ, 2015
Publisher Age Rating: T+

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 2

Tokyo Ghoul, Vol. 2Tokyo Ghoul, originally published as a serial in the manga magazine Weekly Young Jump, follows college student Ken Kaneki as he attempts to survive in a world overrun by ghouls who look and act like humans, but kill and eat their victims in order to survive. When Kaneki accidentally goes on a date with a ghoul and barely survives an attack, he is taken to a hospital to undergo an emergency procedure that leaves him half human, half ghoul. Now he must learn to navigate both worlds while figuring out the politics of Ghoul society. With the help of several ghouls, he will not only learn to live as they do, but keep his secret safe from the Doves, government inspectors who hunt and kill ghouls.

Tokyo Ghoul volume two continues with the same pace and grimness first introduced in volume one, but this time, more background on the human/ghoul conflict is explored. As Kaneki gets to know the ghouls around him, so do the readers. Piece by piece, we learn about the characters and begin to understand the dynamics between them and their community as a whole. Similarly, while we get to know the Doves better, there is still an aura of mystery surrounding Senior Investigator Kureo Mado, whose fascination with the ghouls runs deeper than just protecting humans.

The great thing about Kaneki as the protagonist is that we connect with his emotional turmoil on a more profound level. Things aren’t all black and white in his world and he is beginning to realize that. He went from being a normal college student who hated ghouls to someone who can sympathize with and relate to them. Mirroring these emotions, readers begin to feel torn between wanting the ghouls to be eradicated to preserve the human race, and realizing that ghouls are peoplefor lack of a better term—too, people with family and friends who are just trying to survive. Not all ghouls kill people, and some are uncomfortable with it, so they find ways around it in order to feed humanely. Kaneki’s internal struggle further comes to light when he forms a kinship with the mother/daughter duo, Ryouko and Hinami Fueguchi, and begins to see that maybe ghouls and humans are not that much different from one another. Like anything else, there is good and bad in the world of ghouls and this volume explores that balance.

Author/illustrator Sui Ishida ends the volume beautifully by introducing Kaneki to his first ghoul mask—what ghouls use to hunt in order to keep their identities a secret—just as he has begun to further submerge himself in ghoul culture. We are left to wonder how the mask will transform him: will he continue to resist his ghoul side, or fall deeper into it and leave his humanity behind? It’s a great endpoint, and the fact the mask only exposes his ghoul eye is symbolic of his transformation.

The artwork is phenomenal and works with the story, seamlessly weaving them together to enhance the plot. Ishida captures moments in the story in a deep, yet subtle way by changing the black and white tones he utilizes. Lighter moments of joy and laughter—like the ghouls together at home—are illustrated in white and light gray tones, while fights, attacks, and moments of anguish are drawn entirely in black and dark gray; this makes for effective storytelling. Occasionally, some panels were extremely dark, blending everything together and rendering the fight scenes difficult to follow as there was not enough color contrast to tell the characters apart. Hopefully, this will be improved upon in later volumes.

Tokyo Ghoul volume two is best suited for older teens and adults due to the graphic content (many bodies were graphically severed) and swear words peppered throughout. Even though the pace was much slower than the first volume, the second installment sets up the story, characters, and world in a way that draws the reader in while preparing them for what’s to come. It is a series that will keep readers hungry for more.

Tokyo Ghoul, vol. 2
by Sui Ishida
ISBN: 9781421580371
VIZ, 2015
Publisher Age Rating: T+